CURRENT MOON

You can grow a salad PDF Print E-mail
Friday, 11 August 2017 10:41

Urban gardening is perfect for growing salad ingredients. Space is usually limited in a city garden so you won't be growing corn or other veggies that take up a lot of space. Since the growing season in the Northeast seems to be getting longer (weather is temperate usually until late October), you can take advantage of this and enjoy fresh salad foods for a longer period of time. As the weather cools, you will find that lettuce, peas and radishes thrive again and one can start a second growing season inside. After the summer heat has passed, the seedlings can be moved outside again. Try switching from summer vegetables like tomatoes and peppers to root vegetables like radishes and beets. Kale and chard do very well in the cool weather right into the cold weather.

    Some types of cherry tomatoes to try in a patio pot or raised bed:
  • Sun Sugar
  • Sun Gold
  • Sugar Snack
  • Super Sweet 100
  • Sweet 100
  • Heirloom Cherry
  • Golden Harvest
    Here are a few suitable lettuce types for urban gardening:
  • Red Sails
  • Black Seeded Simpson
  • Mesclun Mix

These varieties do well in raised bed boxes as well as window or patio pots. They are loose leaf and don't grow into "heads", so they are easier to cultivate.

    Don't forget the smaller variety of peppers that can be grown in pots:
  • Cubanelle
  • Cayenne
  • Sweet Red Cherry Pepper

Herbs can be grown on a balcony or windowsill. Try planting Chives for an easy onion-like flavor. Basil is easy to grow in pots and makes a great garnish for fresh tomato with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. Parsley is full of vitamins and adds zip as a garnish or salad ingredient. Cilantro can be used in salads or mixed into salsa for Mexican flavor.

    Since these vegetables and herbs are going to be grown in container gardens remember:
  • Don't let the soil dry out, the roots have nowhere to get water but from you
  • Fertilize regularly. Make your own from coffee grounds, eggshells, etc.
  • Keep an eye out for pests. It's easier to nip things in the bud than to treat an infestation of pests or diseases like fungus.

http://mycitygarden.net/
Last Updated on Friday, 11 August 2017 11:21
 

Related Items



photo: Jeannie Cote

grapes

Follow guitargal77 on Twitter

Subscribe in a reader

DigInDirt.com Garden Blogs

Kinetic Fountains Award



HappyCow's Vegetarian Guide








The Animal Rescue Site


Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU/GPL License.